Hōkūleʻa Update | July 2, 2016

Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe Hōkūleʻa started the month of July with a sail to a new destination. After various engagements within the Martha’s Vineyard community, Hōkūleʻa departed at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, July 1 to make the journey over to Woods Hole. A few members of the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe and local community organizers that the crew connected with at Martha’s Vineyard accompanied the Hōkūleʻa crewmembers on their latest sail.


The canoe’s noon arrival at Woods Hole was marked by a greeting at Dyer’s Dock from representatives of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribal nation and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute community. A short welcome ceremony was performed, including the performance of a song written about Hōkūleʻa by the children of the Neekun School, a Wopanaak Language immersion program.


“In this day and age, we know that it can be confusing about what is meaningful. But this is. This gathering, this togetherness is historical and we will speak of it for generations to come,” said Ramona Peters, an elder of the Mashpee Wampanoag, during the arrival ceremony.

Today, the Hokulea crew are attending the  Mashpee Wampanoag’s 95th annual powwow. The three-day long Native American event filled with traditional songs, dances, cultural ceremonies and other intertribal activities will honor Hōkūleʻa as part of the program.


The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, known as the People of the First Light, has inhabited present-day Massachusetts for more than 12,000 years.

 The crew and canoe are scheduled to participate in Woods Hole community events on July 4, departing July 5 for New Bedford followed by Boston.  

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Hōkūle‘a’s visit to the eastern United States is a historic milestone in her 40 years of voyaging.

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