Hōkūleʻa Update | July 26, 2015

Crewmember Kaiwi Hāmākua-Mākuʻe updates from Hōkūleʻa anchored off of Ashmore Reef in the Timor Sea. Hōkūleʻa’s next stop will be Bali, Indonesia.

Welina mai kākou e nā hoa makamaka mai ka puka ana ka lā i ka hikina a ka welo o ka lā i komohana. Mai ka hoʻokuʻi a ka hālāwai. Mai ka moana hohonu a hiki loa i ka ʻoiʻoi o nā Mauna-a-wakea. Aloha.

My name is Kaiwi Hāmākua-Mākuʻe and I am a crewmember on Hōkūleʻa. For the past three days we have been here at beautiful Ashmore Reef. Such a beautiful place with a lot of history. When we first towed here three days ago and it was interesting that we saw about a dozen sea snakes. When we arrived here, we learned about this place and learned that about two decades ago this place was heavily populated with sea snakes. We learned that about 13 different species lived here and that there was about 40,000 sea snakes counted here in this area. Australian officials even said that if you came here with your boat you could not even get off of your boat because there were so many sea snakes around your boat. When we arrived here for the past three days, we actually didn’t see any sea snakes, which we find really interesting. We saw a lot of different other animals and organisms, a vibrant reef, lots of fish, lots of turtles, even a few different rays but no sea snakes so it raises questions. There obviously has been a change over the past decade. We don’t know why but its just an interesting observation that we could bring more awareness to.


Please help keep us sailing for future generations. All contributions make a difference for our voyage. Mahalo nui loa!

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Hōkūleʻa Update | July 25, 2015

Hōkūleʻa is expected to depart Ashmore Reef between the afternoon of July 26, 2015 and the morning of July 27, 2015 (Australia time). In recent days, winds have been less than 10 knots. Apprentice navigator Jenna Ishii predicts that stronger winds will return tomorrow that will be more conducive to traditional navigation. Since arriving at Ashmore Reef, Worldwide Voyage crewmembers have explored an atoll and surrounding reef which are home to a variety of fish and coral. The crew also scrubbed Hōkūleʻa’s hulls and prepared her for Bali.

Crew update from Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau:

Please help keep us sailing for future generations. All contributions make a difference for our voyage. Mahalo nui loa!

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World Oceans Day Message from Hōkūleʻa


Aloha. This is Haunani Kane. Happy World Oceans Day from the deck of Hōkūleʻa, our traditional Polynesian voyaging canoe. We’re here off the east coast of Australia on our way to the Great Barrier Reef, the worlds largest coral reef ecosystem!

Our voyage is called Mālama Honua, which means “caring for our earth” – it is about creating balance and harmony with our surroundings. We are voyaging around the world to learn and share stories of how people like you are working to navigate our world towards a better destination by caring for your waters, land, people, and communities.

We would love to hear from you how you and your community are working to create positive change in ways big and small. We’ll share these stories on our website through our Mālama Honua Map, where we illustrate and celebrate efforts around the world. Share with us how you care for your place by visiting Hokulea.com and sharing your Mālama Honua story. Aloha


Please help keep us sailing for future generations. All contributions make a difference for our voyage. Mahalo nui loa!

Update | Waiting for Waitangi

Aloha nui kākou! This is Pomai Bertelmann coming to you live from Pahia on the really large moku of Aotearoa. I’m a crewmember on Hōkūleʻa and part of the Worldwide Voyage with Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia. I am truly blessed and grateful to be part of the ʻohana (family) who was able to bring Hōkūleʻa from Pago Pago, American Samoa and Vavaʻu and Tongatapu in the Kingdom of Tonga. And now to be here on the north island of Aotearoa. This has been a really amazing experience for me and for the ʻohana that travelled over the sea. We were able to successfully find and pull up the islands of Te Ika a Maui and Aoteaora in 13 days. We had a great team of navigators, Kaʻiulani Murphy and Kaleo Wong. They were supported by our captain, pwo navigator, and sail master Bruce Blankenfeld, who is such an amazing mentor in the way that he was able to lead and direct and to support the navigation that was happening onboard. We had an amazing group of people on the canoe. There were four wahine and 11 men. What that does is that makes for an amazing opportunity to come together as ʻohana. And what is truly amazing about that is that there is great balance; thereʻs kāne (male) and wahine (female) like we have the kāne and wahine hulls of the canoe. There was that kind of balance on the canoe. We arrived here in Pahia three days ago, and we are collectively preparing the canoes – Hōkūlʻea and Hikianalia – and the crews for our pōwhiri and our welcome into Waitangi here in the Bay of Islands where many years ago in 1985, Hōkūleʻa came and made and built relationships with many families and friends here in Waitangi. Those relationships are ongoing. We have Uncle Hector Busby who was here and part of that coordination. We are also here to celebrate Uncle Tupi Puriri who helped to orchestrate everything that happened here in 1985, as well as Sir James Henare and the people of Aotearoa who accepted us graciously and who have loved us from afar and who have done everything they could to allow us to be here. And so we are preparing for that time both on the exterior in the environment, but also on the inside because this is a monumental opportunity for many of us. A few of those names mentioned are no longer with us. So potentially in another 29 or 30 years when it’s likely that the canoe will come through again, there’s a potential that some of us may not be here as well. In preparation, we make sure that what we are doing will allow us the opportunity to be part of the moment and be in the moment of what is taking place and give of our whole selves. So it has been an amazing opportunity be here. I am very blessed to be part of this voyaging ʻohana waʻa. We look forward to the next couple of days ahead to celebrating waʻa in this time. There will be a live stream tomorrow beginning at 11am Hawaiʻi Standard Time. Please continue to follow us at Hokulea.com. Mahalo!

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